The language

Bulgarian is native to Bulgaria, Turkey, Serbia, Greece, Ukraine, Moldova, Romania, Albania, Kosovo, the Republic of Macedonia and among emigrant communities worldwide.

Plovdiv, Bulgaria. Photo by Deniz Fuchidzhiev

The dialects

The language is mainly split into two broad dialect areas, based on the different forms of the yat vowel. This split, which occurred at some point during the Middle Ages, led to the development of Bulgaria’s western dialects, informally called ‘hard speech’, and eastern dialects, informally called ‘soft speech’.

The script

Bulgarian was the first Slavic language attested in writing. Bulgaria gave the world the Cyrillic script, the second most widely used alphabet in the world. After undergoing several changes over the centuries, the current Bulgarian script was standardised in 1945 and it has 30 letters.

Translation

When translating from Bulgarian to English, the word count increases by approximately 20%.

Bulgarian culture

A number of ancient civilizations, including the ancient Greeks, Romans, Slavs, and especially the Bulgars, have left their mark on the culture, history and heritage of Bulgaria. Bulgaria has nine UNESCO World Heritage Sites, a long-standing musical tradition, and a rich heritage in the visual arts, especially in frescoes, murals and icons. Due to the relatively warm climate and diverse geography affording excellent growth-conditions for a variety of vegetables, herbs and fruits, Bulgarian cuisine offers great diversity, rich natural healing herbs, and remedies.